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Drives up to 20 White LEDs

June 18, 2004 by Staff
The LT3466, a dual, full function, step-up DC/DC converter drives up to 20 white LEDs from a Li-Ion battery. 
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Panel-Mount LED Lamps

June 18, 2004 by Staff
PNL-1145 series LED lamps are direct incandescent replacements for discontinued GE ET5/6 incandescent high-voltage panel indictor lamps that are found in control rooms of power plants, substations and utilities.
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SMT LED with Domed Lens

June 18, 2004 by Staff
Cotco’s domed lens power SMT LEDs, the LM2 series offers high reliability and is suited for effect lighting applications. They can handle forward currents up to 70mA in a domed lens PLCC-4 package measuring 3.2 x 2.8mm. 
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Fibre Optic Backlight

June 18, 2004 by Staff
The UniGlo Optima fibre optic backlight offers a high brightness of 30+ Ft-L and more, depending on panel design and configuration. 
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LED Par-Style Lamp

June 18, 2004 by Staff
Featuring an all-in-one LED-based lighting alternative for incandescent spot and flood lamps used in architectural and interior accent lighting, the Infinite 1 LED Lamp offers energy savings of over 90% and life expectancy rated in years.
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Reverse engineering – some cautions

June 7, 2004 by Staff
Why do companies reverse engineer?Reverse engineering techniques are used to develop competing interoperable products as well as to analyze how a competitor's product works, what it does, who manufactures it, what components it consists of, estimate costs, identify potential patent infringement, et cetera. Most importantly, companies use reverse engineering techniques to assist in the development of a competing product that does not infringe a competitor's patent.
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Microsystems – Fuelling Canada's 21st Century Economy

June 7, 2004 by Staff
{toggle author}From the cars we drive, to the computers we use at home and work, to the Internet that puts us in touch with the world - microsystems are at the heart of virtually everything we do. Even the food we eat, clean water we drink, and treatment we receive when we're sick is dramatically improved by advances in microsystems. And just as important, they contribute to economic growth across diverse industrial sectors.
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Whole Larger Than the Sum of its Parts

June 7, 2004 by Staff
The electronics industry has changed a lot over the last two or three years. Most of the change has centered around cost cutting, as manufacturers struggled to improve their bottom lines, and in some cases to merely survive.
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Analog-to-digital converter chip improves voice quality for cellular phones

June 7, 2004 by Staff
OTTAWA - Zarlink Semiconductor is reportedly the first company to develop advanced digital microphone technology that boosts the performance of the next generation of cellular phones.
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Implementation Strategies for USB Circuit Protection

June 7, 2004 by Staff
Figure 1. Circuit protection and power switching requirements for USB.{toggle author}The USB specification requires current limiting and/or power switching for USB power management, and references resettable polymeric positive temperature coefficient (PPTC) devices and solid-state switches as acceptable methods for overcurrent protection. Resettable current limiting in a fault condition helps prevent circuit damage and associated system failure, and helps the system meet UL safety standards.
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Harmony, Chords and Colour

June 7, 2004 by Staff
Figure 1: The incandescent backlighting used for the power output meters in the model MC602 power amplifier (top) caused a blue tint around the edges that became progressively more washed out toward the center. In its newer model MC501, the use of fibre optic panel backlighting resulted in a perfectly uniform, brilliant blue.{toggle author}When it comes to top-of-the-line audio components, no company raises the bar as high as McIntosh Laboratory Inc. does. The Binghamton, NY company has been known as the standard of excellence in high fidelity audio amplifiers since 1949, and manufactures a range of high-end power amplifiers, audio control centers and other products for home, auto and professional use that are sold through dealerships around the world.
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Quasi-Resonant, Zero-Current Switching DC/DC Converters

June 7, 2004 by Staff
Figure 1. Diagram of a quasi-resonant, zero-current switching DC/DC converter.{toggle author}Switching converters were introduced in the 1960s to achieve the reductions in size and weight promised by higher than line frequency operation. Initial products had switching frequencies of 20 - 30 kHz. By the late 1970s, with the advent of component improvements such as high-speed transistors, frequencies over 100 kHz were being achieved. Unfortunately, switching-related losses, which also increased with frequency, were becoming prohibitively high. Against this backdrop, the quasi-resonant, zero-current switching (ZCS) DC/DC converter was introduced with switching frequencies of 1 MHz, overcoming the frequency-related loss barrier. Each switch cycle delivers a quantized packet of energy to the converter output, with each switch turn-on and turn-off occurring at zero current, resulting in switch losses related only to current conduction, independent of frequency.