Electronic Products & Technology

Concerns over patent infringement, license royalties are mounting

Feelings linger amidst strong consumer electronics market

January 2, 2021  By Globe NewsWire (via NewMediaWire)

Hop-on, Inc. an Albuquerque NM-based electronic OEM and developer of the world’s first disposable cell phone, is renewing its efforts to help bring US and Asian companies into compliance with essential patent licensing and royalty requirements.

Hop On Inc. designed the 4K Ultra HD Smart TV Stick.

Despite job losses and other economic impacts, the consumer electronics market proved strong numbers in 2020 with over USD$400-billion in retail revenues in the United States, closely matching projections set before the global pandemic took hold. Today’s modern devices include countless advanced patented technologies such as Nokia’s H.264 MP4 Advanced Video Codec that are protected by US and international intellectual property rights, but many companies are willfully refusing to license and pay royalties for those technologies.

With ITC cases mounting under the Trump administration as patent infringement and royalty enforcement were stepped up, and Biden and Harris making clear that their policies will “expand the legal tools available to American victims of trade theft”, intellectual property rights will continue to be an area of concern for companies that dump unlicensed products into the US market without paying their fair share of royalties.

Faced billions in royalties for past infringements

Since 2001, Hop-on, Inc. has secured essential patent license agreements and worked with numerous foreign companies to mitigate their potential losses to market share and revenues from ITC injunctions, protracted litigation, and unfavorable post-infringement license negotiations. Companies large and small have been blocked from selling their products in the US, faced billions in royalties for their past infringements and go-forward payments well above FRAND rates. With such grave threats, companies need to act quickly to resolve their intellectual property licensing deficiencies to stay in the US marketplace.

Advertisment

“The reality is, over 50% of consumer electronics, computing, and integrated media systems coming from China into the US aren’t paying their fair share and are risking everything if they continue to operate the way they have been. Hop-on has the solutions and can make the transition to doing legitimate business in the United States as painless and transparent as possible, with limited impact to their bottom line. It’s just the right thing to do,” says Peter Michaels, CEO of Hop-on.

 

 

 


Print this page

Related Stories

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*