DAILY NEWS Feb 27, 2013 7:00 AM - 0 comments

Thalmic Labs unveils wearable gesture control device

MYO next-gen gesture control transforms how you interact with technology

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2013-02-27

 Waterloo-based startup Thalmic Labs has launched its next generation gesture control device, MYO, an armband worn on the forearm that senses electrical activity in the muscles, allowing users to interact with digital technologies using just their fingers and hands.

MYO is an industry game-changer for many reasons. Unlike other gesture control devices, it doesn't require a camera to sense the user's movements, freeing them from the confines of a fixed space to maintain connection with the device being controlled. The device can connect wirelessly to computers, mobile devices, and other electronics over a Bluetooth Low Energy connection.

"As a company, we're interested in how we can use technology to enhance our abilities as humans - in short, giving us superpowers," explains Stephen Lake, co-founder and CEO of Thalmic Labs on the motivation behind MYO. "We're excited to see how the MYO blurs the lines between us and digital technology."

Currently available for pre-order at www.getmyo.com, MYO sells for $149. Along with the pre-sale of the device, Thalmic Labs is also launching the MYO API that will allow developers to utilize the device's sophisticated hardware to experiment, build and eventually profit from the many applications of MYO technology.

Thalmic Labs was founded in 2012 by three University of Waterloo Mechatronics Engineering graduates (Aaron Grant, Matthew Bailey, and Stephen Lake) and has since grown to 10 employees. As announced in January, the company is a part of Y Combinator's winter 2013 cohort and has raised funding totaling $1.1 million.

Photos

Thalmic Labs Co-Founder & CEO Stephen Lake shows off a prototype of MYO, the company's new wearable gesture control device. (The Canadian Press Images PHOTO/Thalmic Labs Inc.)
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Caption: Thalmic Labs Co-Founder & CEO Stephen Lake shows off a ...
Thalmic's gesture control armband MYO. Worn on the forearm MYO senses electrical activity in the muscles, allowing users to interact with digital technologies using just their fingers and hands. (The Canadian Press Images PHOTO/Thalmic Labs Inc.)
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Caption: Thalmic's gesture control armband MYO. Worn on the fore...


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